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Featured Stories

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Learn about our patient's experiences and meet our clinical oncology team.

Patient Stories

Cadence
It is now almost one year after Cadence was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma. She just turned 11 years-old on June 26th and is in good spirits, showing no sign that anything was ever wrong. Although we know she is not cured, we are grateful to have had more time than we expected thanks to the doctors, staff and volunteers of the CSU Flint Animal Cancer Center! read more...

Lily
Our beloved Golden Retriever Lily started having seizures in March of 2012 at the age of four. Up to that time Lily had been an active, loving, healthy and smart dog. Our local vet was baffled. We had heard about the CSU FACC in Fort Collins and made an appointment for as soon as we could get there. read more...

Molly
We knew Molly had to pass a series of tests before the final decision could be made to go ahead with the surgery. She was examined, had a needle biopsy on a lymph node and then the CT scan. Everything came back with good news, so she was given the green light for surgery. Molly did so well that she was able to go home the next day. She ate and slept well all through her recovery. Like I said, Molly never misses a meal! About a week later we got the great news that the tumor was completely removed. read more...

Lucky
Lucky became more than my service dog. He enriched my life in ways I didn't know were possible. He became my best friend, constant companion, confidant, coworker and, most importantly, my bridge to a world I feared might be slipping away from me. When you must navigate through a busy world sitting down, it's easy to be overlooked by others. People are unsure about how to approach someone in a wheelchair, so they will often pretend not to see. Lucky bridged that gulf. read more...

Bogey
I brought Bo to Colorado State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital to see specialists in orthopedics and neurology, but after they reviewed his MRI and CT scan, the discussion unexpectedly turned to cancer. At that point, I felt myself crashing. read more...

Smudge
Smudge joined our family following a call from Heather's brother Harv asking if we wanted another dog as a companion to our Maltese Muffin. Harv set him on our livingroom floor and Smudge, at six weeks of age, promptly peed on the carpet and wrapped his little paws around our hearts. read more...

Elway
I've had dogs my entire life, and though I've loved them all, there was one that was special. His name was Elway. He was seven weeks old when I brought him home and a bundle of energy. There were three things I could always count on with him - he always had to carry something in his mouth, his tail wagged non-stop, and he hardly ever slept in fear he'd miss something. read more...

Reagan
I knew something wasn't right. After six months, changing vets, and my insistence on multiple tests, we finally and devastatingly diagnosed Reagan with Transitional Cell Carcinoma. Just before her procedure, her surgeon suggested having her treated at Colorado State University Animal Cancer Center where they had the capability to provide advanced treatment for Reagan's condition. Coincidentally, I had been considering relocating to Colorado and this provided the inspiration to move. With her appointment scheduled we were in Denver within a week. read more...

Pythagoras
Pythagoras is a dog with presence: a big, warm, gentle personality that envelopes you like a soft blanket when you meet him. A walk with Pythagoras becomes a community event in his Broomfield neighborhood because people notice him. A happy, friendly 120 pound Saint Bernard dog can affect people that way. read more...

Bullit
At five weeks old, he was tiny, and that first night he slept all snuggled up on my chest. That night our bond was cemented. He saw me through many challenging life changes including moves from Albuquerque to Denver and then to Boulder, relationship heartbreaks and life in general. We have made many fantastic trips to the mountains to camp and hike. He has seen me laugh and cry. He has been my rock, always there when I walk through that door. Our world changed in December 2009 as I returned home from a visit with family. read more...

Sophie
Sophie entered my home for the first time on September 15, 2001. She was exactly eight weeks old and scarcely longer than my unfurled palm. A silken salt-and-pepper coat, which would eventually become uniformly platinum, was just beginning to emerge through her chunky puppy fur. read more...

Elliott
Somehow out of despair came hope and what our family calls "CSU magic." As if seeing a Head of State, the entire medical team gathered for our briefing to discuss all of the options. His prognosis was actually quite bright but might entail an exhaustive protocol of radiation therapy. We had a very emotional decision to make. read more...

Cooper
I always joked that I went to the dentist and came home with a puppy. It was the best dentist appointment I've ever had! He was one in a litter of eleven that had been brought in to the Montrose Animal Shelter. This little boy was going to be mine, or should I say I was going to be his. I fell in love immediately and Cooper came home with me June 6, 2000. His big sister Gracie and Dad, my husband Mike, greeted him without hesitation and soon found out the incredible amount of love contained in this wonderful little boy. read more...

Carmen
Hello everyone, my name is Carmen and this is my story. I was born on October 15, 2001 as part of a litter of 10 puppies! My parents to be, picked up both my sister and I and we were very excited. So, both of us started pouring on the charm. You know licking them and wagging our little nubs to get them to fall in love with us. Guess what, it worked and we both found our forever homes that day! Wow, did our lives change. read more...

Sage
I got Sage as a puppy from England in late 1999 with big dreams for her to become a search and rescue dog. As a former K-9 corrections officer and FEMA disaster K-9 trainer, I have trained several service dogs but Sage is special – partly because she is my own dog. She was 2 years old and fully certified when we got the call to report to the Pentagon after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. read more...

Ellie
One day, right after Ellie's 3rd birthday, we noticed that she was running a little bit weird. Neither of us could quite put our finger on what was different, we just knew it looked weird. Our veterinarian studied her out in the grass for a little while and after several minutes of massaging and feeling all limbs, found a tiny lump deep under the tissue on the front of her left rear ankle. read more...

Benny
When Benny began limping, initially, our vet treated him with pain relievers and nutritional supplements hoping it was a muscle strain or the aches and pains of being a senior dog. When these therapies had no effect she x-rayed him and saw something suspicious in his left front leg, it was osteosarcoma. We’d heard from some of our most trusted animal rescue friends that the CSU Animal Cancer Center was THE place to go for state-of-the art cancer care. We learned about available treatments and clinical trials and decided to take Benny to the ACC’s cancer experts. read more...

Alps
I will never forget the scene as I drove up the driveway to the breeder's home. I could see a "carpet" of puppies running and playing in the front yard. When I arrived, all the puppies greeted me and I sat down to let them play around me. I asked which puppy was available as she put one of the male puppies into my arms. I never put him back down! read more...

Emmy
Before Emmy, we had never had a female dog. We saw Emmy on the day she was born, and every week thereafter until we took her home seven weeks later. She’s so wonderful that two years later, when they had the next litter, we got a full sister to Emmy. These are great Labradors. read more...

Cain
I would like to be able to say that I chose Cain, but truth be told he chose me. I can still remember when my son brought him home that summer of 1999. He was the funniest looking little puppy, with pink, saggy skin and the most homely expression you’ve ever seen. read more...

Sierra
She loved being around people, chasing butterflies and balls, swimming in anything wet, riding in the car, rolling in the grass, romping in the snow or sitting on my lap, all 80 pounds of her. read more...

Riley
Our pets are totally dependent on us. Riley looks at me with absolute trust. I don’t think I could I ever betray that trust. Riley wouldn’t give up on me. I couldn’t give up on him. The reward is that, at least to this point, we have conquered his cancer foe and I get to spend more quality time with my best friend. read more...

Jake
He always meets me at the door with a big smile and wagging tail regardless of what I am going through or how I am feeling. Getting the news that Jake has cancer was heart wrenching. He recently became a pen pal to a child fighting cancer through the Youth and Pet Survivors Program (YAPs Program) at the Children's Hospital of Denver. read more...

KC Masterpiece
“Piece” was born in April of 2000. He was the most beautiful cat I had ever seen. He was like a little painted rock, with all the stripes and spirals he was supposed to have as a tabby - a masterpiece. Since I had just moved to Kansas, I named him KC Masterpiece. read more...

Mingus
Mingus was a Vizsla. I knew nothing of hunting when I got him, but the dog training book said I had to go out and get a bird wing. One thing led to another, and he trained me how to hunt. read more...

Sarah
Sarah came to our Ranch in the early years when we began raising alpacas. As we are at 8000 feet on the high prairie, there are bear, fox, coyote, bobcat and mountain lion in close proximity to our Ranch. read more...

Wiley
More than three years later, it is still incredibly hard to reflect on our story without falling apart—impossible, actually. I was in my fourth year in the D.V.M. program at Colorado State University, and halfway through my three week rotation in large animal overnights at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, when I realized Wiley didn't seem right. read more...

Happer
Happer is a yellow lab who has been with me day and night, for nearly thirteen years. He was with me through high school, through my first pheasant hunt, and was even the ring bearer at our wedding. read more...

Albion
Albion was our perfect dog, who was going to live forever. When she started limping and had a little bit of swelling around her right wrist, we ice packed it for a couple of days. read more...

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Meet the Clinical Oncology Team

Dr. Stephen Withrow
As an intern, in 1972, at the Animal Medical Center in New York City, very green and young, I used to attend the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center rounds. I became aware that veterinary medicine could have a significant influence on human health, at the same time, treating animals. read more...

Dr. Rodney Page
Dr. Page, a veterinarian and an alumnus of CSU's College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (Class of 1981), also holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Master of Science in physiology from Georgetown University Medical School in Washington, D.C. Dr. Page comes to CSU from Cornell University where he was the founding director of the Sprecher Institute for Comparative Cancer Research and served as the chair for the Department of Clinical Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine. read more...

Dr. Susan Lana
Before I even knew I wanted to be a veterinarian, I had an interest in studying cancer. While in college, I worked in the blood bank of a hospital with a large bone marrow transplant unit. There, I began to understand that cancer is so different. It’s not just one disease, it’s many diseases with many different outcomes. It’s also a non-discriminatory disease; anybody can get it. You don’t have to be rich or poor, black or white, or a dog or a cat…anybody can be touched by cancer. read more...

Dr. Nicole Ehrhart
I meet a little girl named Jenny who just had an amputation due to cancer. As a young surgery resident, learning about limb-salvage surgical procedures, I wondered why her leg had to be amputated. That’s when I discovered there weren’t any limb-salvage options for children, because children are still growing. That little girl inspired me to be part of the global battle against cancer. The over-arching goal of my research is limb preservation. read more...

Dr. Deanna Worley
I was raised in Montana, where I earned my undergraduate degree in biomedical science at Montana State University. I knew I wanted a career in medicine-either human or veterinary medicine-and struggled with the decision for years before I made up my mind. As a freshman veterinary student, I quickly realized that I wanted to be a surgeon. read more...

Dr. Bernard Seguin
I have always wanted to be a veterinarian, from the day I learned there were doctors who treat animals. The fact that I never changed my mind, some might say, shows my determination, while others might characterize it as stubbornness. I believe it is a little of both. Being a veterinarian has been a great privilege. I have learned so much from my patients and their owners and I have been inspired by so many mentors. read more...

Dr. Doug Thamm
My wife and I are actually both cancer survivors. I had to take a year off of veterinary school to be treated for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. My wife was treated for thyroid cancer. Prior to that experience, I had an opportunity to spend some time doing laboratory research at the University of Pennsylvania. I really got the sense that I wanted to have a research component to my career. read more...

Dr. Susan LaRue
Dr. Susan LaRue is originally from Maryland and received her undergraduate education at the University of Maryland. She received her DVM from the University of Georgia, where she also did her internship. She came to Colorado State University in 1983 for a residency in small animal surgery, and subsequently became a Diplomate in the College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS). read more...

Meredy Razey
It all started with my love for animals... I started working for a small animal private practice after school and then applied for a job at CSU. I have been here ever since. I joined Dr. Stephen Withrow in 1985, when he was first getting the oncology service started. In the early days of the oncology service I was the only oncology nurse. read more...

Dr. Katie Swift
At CSU, I was introduced to oncology during my junior year in the veterinary medicine program and found that I was strongly drawn to radiation oncology. I spent as much extra time as I could in that area, learning the protocols and getting to know the team really well. I could say that I have an interest in oncology because my life has been touched by cancer, and it has, but cancer has touched almost everyone’s life. read more...

Dr. Annie Galloway
My interest in oncology is more than just the science of cancer, which is fascinating; but I also have a deep appreciation for the unique clinician-patient-client bond that develops. Being able to help a patient’s family through such a chaotic, confusing time is what medicine is all about: helping and healing. read more...

Nikki Roatch
Wanting to return to working with animals and continue to build upon my research background, I joined Colorado State University’s Flint Animal Cancer Center in the spring of 2015. I have really found my niche here as it combines my passion for science and my interest in working with and on behalf of animals. read more...

Dr. Beatrix Jenei
I am thrilled to be sharing clinical work, research opportunities, and learning from some of the finest and most skilled individuals in the field of veterinary oncology. Working with medical, surgical, and radiation oncologists at the Flint Animal Cancer Center promotes the best form of medicine and allows tailored treatment plans for individual patients. read more...

Dr. Amber Wolf-Ringwall
I am deeply honored to have been selected as a Lucy Scholar, a program that provides support to a veterinarian seeking advanced training in medical oncology. The support allows me to make the most of the opportunities offered throughout my residency. read more...

Dr. Ruth Rose
I truly feel blessed that for the next two years as a non-traditional Fellow candidate in surgical oncology, I will be continuing my research with Dr. Ehrhart and participating in the clinic as a surgical oncology Fellow candidate. It is an honor to work with and learn from the leaders in veterinary oncology at the FACC. read more...

Wendy Mullins
My interest in oncology is more than just the science of cancer, which is fascinating; but I also have a deep appreciation for the unique clinician-patient-client bond that develops. Being able to help a patient’s family through such a chaotic, confusing time is what medicine is all about: helping and healing. read more...

Dr. Benoit Clerc-Renaud
Each day is a blessing to work with some of the best veterinarians in the field of veterinary oncology today, including specialists in radiation, medical, and surgical oncology. The Flint Animal Cancer Center is well known as a source of hope for patients and their owners, as well as a dedicated research institute for the study and treatment of cancer. read more...

Dr. Rebecca Packer
A key reason I came to CSU was the Flint Animal Cancer Center. I wanted to become part of the team, to collaborate with world-class veterinary oncologists in treating tumors of the brain and spine, and to conduct strategic comparative research that benefits both animal and human cancer patients. read more...

Dr. Brandan Wustefeld-Janssens
At the FACC, we take a multidisciplinary approach to cancer, bringing medical, surgical and radiation oncology perspectives together to address each case; and providing each patient a complete and comprehensive treatment plan. Every oncology case is a challenge because the disease is individual in each patient, even if the same type of cancer. read more...

Dr. Brittany Wittenberns
I believe a unique opportunity rests with veterinary oncologists centered on a common goal of improving quality of life for the cancer patient and family, sharing information and listening carefully to make sure the best decision is made for each patient and their family. read more...

Robyn Mascolino
I have tremendous respect for the research, teaching, learning and service that happens here and I believe in the FACC mission: to improve prevention and treatment of cancer in animals and humans… through the thoughtful, innovative, caring, and careful study of the causes and treatment of cancer in animals. read more...

Dr. Tiffany Wormhoudt
Another reason I was excited to return to the FACC is the considerable amount of translational research conducted here, and the center’s collaboration with one of the finest human cancer centers: the University of Colorado Cancer Center in Denver. Cancer is the same in animals and humans, which means that, as a veterinary oncologist, I can have meaningful conversations with my counterparts in human medicine. read more...

Dr. Barb Biller
I was interested in equine medicine when I started veterinary school, and thought it’d be fun to treat horses. The oncology lectures in my third year, changed my mind. The instructor was a really good teacher and really fired up my imagination about treating cancer. From there it was mostly meeting the right people at the right time as I went along. My interest continued to increase as I realized that oncology was a great way to incorporate the research background I had before I went into veterinary school. read more...

Dr. Keara Boss
I believe a good radiation oncologist must be compassionate and communicate clearly and honestly with patient families, listening attentively to understand their goals for their pet before embarking on a treatment plan. read more...

Dr. Katie Stroda
Prior to being accepted into the residency program, I visited the FACC for a one-month externship, taking cases and soaking up everything I could. The experience reinforced my belief that oncology was where I wanted to specialize, and I am thrilled to be working, studying, learning and engaging in research in this specialty at the best place in the world to do so. read more...

Dr. Brendan Boostrom
Throughout our residency, not only are we on the clinic floor seeing a range of cases-- including radiation and surgical cases--but we are also intimately involved in clinical trials. Working alongside such skilled clinicians and researchers pushes me to rise to the challenge each day - to do the best I possibly can for my patients and their families. read more...

Dr. Kristen Weishaar
While I sometimes think I have wanted to specialize in oncology since I decided to pursue a career in veterinary medicine, I know that isn’t the case. The oncology part of my career did not crystallize until my junior year of undergraduate studies when I was diagnosed with two brain tumors: one in my pineal gland and the other in my pituitary gland. read more...

Dr. Lisa Brownlee
I wanted to work in a university hospital setting and was very happy to be offered a position with the clinical trials service at the Flint Animal Cancer Center. My skills as a small animal internist were complementary to those of a medical oncologist. Because there is a lot of patient assessment required, through physical exams and performing procedures that can range from an endoscopy to a biopsy, my skill set is valuable to the service and helpful in teaching oncology residents who are learning to perform those procedures. In turn, I learn a lot from the oncologists. read more...

Deanna Williams
As the surgical oncology nurse, my first responsibility is ensuring that surgery day schedules are coordinated and run smoothly; and that clients are kept well-informed all along the way. It’s important to the surgical team—especially during high-risk surgeries—that clients are kept apprised of how their pets are doing, and I like providing that bit of extra service. read more...

FACC Oncology Nurses
Our oncology nurses represent the best in their field. They are knowledgeable, compassionate, and highly skilled caregivers devoted to the safety and comfort of all our patients. read more...

Sandra Larson
I joined the Flint Animal Cancer Center as oncology client coordinator in August, 2012 after many years of admiring all the organization stands for. My role as the oncology client coordinator is to help clients and referring veterinarians from all over the world connect to our clinical expertise and services. I manage our online consultation service and help people by phone and in person, too. read more...

Dr. Dan Gustafson
I went to graduate school in 1988, in biochemistry. It just happened that I was working on the biochemistry of drugs used to treat cancer. It was really that serendipitous. The kind of chemistry I was interested in focused on the development of chemotherapeutic agents. I studied them from a purely biochemistry side, with no thought whatsoever of them going into people or animals. And when I started, nobody in my family had been diagnosed, treated, or died of cancer. That’s changed dramatically. With four aunts, an uncle, and my mother having been diagnosed since then, the family history became very personal very quickly. read more...

Flint Animal Cancer Center
The CSU Robert H. and Mary G Flint Animal Cancer Center opened its doors in 2002. The building is a 35,000 square foot addition to the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital and is dedicated to innovative and collaborative cancer research and state-of-the-art cancer diagnostics and treatment for pets. read more...

YAPS
The Youth and Pet Survivors Program (YAPS) is a pen pal program that matches pediatric oncology patients with dogs and cats who have survived cancer or other serious medical conditions. Children and pets (via their owners) establish relationships and communicate through letter writing. This allows children the unique opportunity to share feelings about having cancer with a safe, unconditionally loving animal. YAPS pet owners report a sense of contribution knowing that their pet’s illness can make a difference in a child’s life. read more...